About Vienna - Your City Travel Guide
About Vienna - Your City Travel Guide
About Vienna - Your City Travel Guide
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Tour 1

From Baroque to modern age


St Stephen's Cathedral

Stephansdom (St. Stephen's Cathedral)

The Stephansdom was built in 1147 and is the city's most famous landmark. The cathedral has two very impressive features: The gigantic roof and the tall, lean gothic tower (136,7 m high). If your feet still carry you, climb up the 343 steps of the south tower: the panoramic view is certainly worth it!

Peterskirche

Peterskirche

The Peterskirche was built in 792 and is together with the Ruprechtskiche among the oldest churches in Vienna. In 1701 it was pulled down and in the following 30 years it has been rebuilt by Johann Lukas von Hildebrandt. The church is an adaption to the Petersdom in Rome. In the interior you can enjoy the rich baroque décor.

Graben

Graben

The Graben was named after the moat surrounding the Roman wall. Here you can see art noveau houses. House Nr. 10, the so called Ankerhaus, is the only remaining house built by Otto Wagner. In medieval times the Kohlmarkt has already been used as a trade route. Today it is an architectural extravagant and modern street.

Tomb in Michaelerkirche

Michaelerkirche

The church St. Michael was built in the first half of the 13th century. In the ensuing centuries, the church was rebuilt several times. Not long after Mozart's death, his "Requiem" was first performed in this church. Today, the Michaelerkirche is visited mostly for its interesting catacombs. The most famous person buried in there is Pietro Metastasio, who wrote some of the librettos of Mozart's operas.

Karlskirche

Karlsplatz

The Karlsplatz is a traffic junction and has already been one in the Roman period. In the 18th century Emperor Karl V ordered, after the disappearance of the plague epidemic, the construction of the baroque Karlskirche, a famous and beautiful church. The underground pavilion marks the stops of the undergound that you should use in order to get to the Gasometer (U3).

Gasometer

Gasometer

Four teams of star architects have been working, since the end of the 1990's, on converting four 102-year-old gasometers into a new urban complex. The 22,000 m2 ground floor of the gasometer complex has a shopping mall with about 70 shops and it houses about 615 modern flats as well as an events hall holding 4,200 people. The gigantic size of this construction project is illustrated by the fact that Vienna's Giant Ferris Wheel would easily fit into each of the four 75-metre high gasometers.

Foto - Michaelerkirche Gruft: Roger Mladek | pixelio.de

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